ATLA

anchoiviess:

The writers of ATLA and Nickelodeon released comic book sets that explain what happened to Zuko’s mother, Toph’s relationship with her parents, how Republic City was founded, and other events that are linked to the Legend of Korra.

The Promise
image

(Part 1)
(Part 2)
(Part 3)

The Search
image

(Part 1)
(Part 2)
(Part 3)

The Rift
image

(Part 1)
(Part 2)
(Part 3) Scheduled to be released in November 2014

(via markwulfgar)

black-belt-in-origami:

real-faker:

virginmarx:

zebablah:

television history

i’ve been trying to explain this sketch to people for years

there is literally no way to explain this sketch it’s just a thing you have to see and even then I’m not sure why it’s so funny

this is art

(via mcthundergoose)

usbdongle:



oh that’s a California License

usbdongle:

oh that’s a California License

(via mcthundergoose)

dentoraichi:

dentoraichi:

Eyes of the heroes~

Can someone explain how this gets nearly a hundred notes? It’s a doodle щ(ºДºщ) I mean I’m happy it got popular with people but….why?

dentoraichi:

dentoraichi:

Eyes of the heroes~

Can someone explain how this gets nearly a hundred notes? It’s a doodle щ(ºДºщ) I mean I’m happy it got popular with people but….why?

ashleighjane-art:

Finally uploading my Hiragana and Katakana Charts! Yay!

Just to give you a quick explanation, hiragana and katakana are both Japanese alphabets, used with Kanji (Chinese Characters).

Originally, Japan didn’t have a writing system and when they found the need for one they borrowed the Chinese writing system. Because Chinese and Japanese are such different languages, hiragana was created to fill in the gaps (you will find out more about this as you learn more Japanese).

Katakana was later created to translate English words, and some other foreign words, that had no equivalent word in Japanese. Katakana is used for foreign names including the names of countries, the names of people, etc. It can also be used to emphasis Japanese words.

Well, history lesson over! Let’s start learning how to write in Japanese!! Feel free to print out my Hiragana and Katakana Charts.

While you are here, check out my Facebook Page!

(via mcthundergoose)